Chamomile Growing Guide

Chamomile

Crop Rotation Group

Miscellaneous 

Soil

Fertile, well drained soil.

Position

A sunny spot, for example at the end of a vegetable row or bed.

Frost tolerant

Young seedlings easily tolerate spring frosts, and may survive winters in mild climates. The easiest chamomile to grow is a cool-season annual.

Feeding

Not usually required.

Companions

Calendula, Coriander, Feverfew, Cabbage, Onion, Onions and Spinach. Leafy greens grown in spring, as well as spring-blooming herbs and flowers.

Spacing

Single Plants: 30cm (11") each way (minimum)
Rows: 25cm (9") with 40cm (1' 3") row gap (minimum)

Sow and Plant

Seeds can be started indoors or sown directly in the garden. When allowed to shed mature seeds, chamomile often becomes a welcome volunteer plant.
Our Garden Planner can produce a personalised calendar of when to sow, plant and harvest for your area.

Notes

Feathery chamomile foliage contrasts well with the textures of other herbs and flowers.

Harvesting

Cut branches when they are holding numerous open flowers, and hang in small bunches to dry. Chamomile tea is made from the blossoms only. When the stems are dry, pop off the blossoms and store them in an airtight container.

Troubleshooting

Rabbits enjoy nibbling chamomile foliage.

Planting and Harvesting Calendar

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Pests which Affect Chamomile